Unlocking the Promise of Digital Assessment

For many professors, student assessment is one of the most labor-intensive components of teaching a class. Items must be prepared, rubrics created, and instructions written. The work continues as the tests are scored, papers read, and comments shared. Performing authentic and meaningful student assessment takes time. Consequently, some professors construct relatively few assessments for their courses... continue reading.

Designing Developmentally: Simple Strategies to Get Students Thinking

I continue to be concerned that we don’t design learning experiences as developmentally as we should. What happens to students across a course (and the collection of courses that make up a degree program) ought to advance their knowledge and skills. Generally, we do a good job on the knowledge part, but we mostly take skill development for granted. We assume it just happens, and it does, sort of, just not as efficiently and extensively as it could if we purposefully intervened..... continue reading.

Web Tools to Create Concept Maps

Concept maps continue to helps students and educators across the globe in multiple ways. The ease of organized content is a big time relief as it makes easier for the learner to get a hold of the topics by breaking them in multiple parts. There are various web tools that van help student make these concept maps..... continue reading.

Six significant challenges for technology in higher education in 2017

The NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition came out earlier this week, laying out what its panel of experts believe to be the significant challenges hampering technology adoption in universities in 2017.... continue reading.

A Learner-Centered Syllabus Helps Set the Tone for Learning

At its most basic level, the syllabus is used to communicate information about the course, the instructor, learning objectives, assignments, grading policies, due dates, the university’s academic integrity statement, and, in some cases, an increasingly long list of strongly worded admonitions on what is and isn’t acceptable behavior in the college classroom.... continue reading.

First Day of Class Activities that Create a Climate for Learning

There’s no discounting the importance of the first day of class. What happens that day sets the tone for the rest of the course. Outlined below are a few novel activities for using that first day of class to emphasize the importance of learning and the responsibility students share for shaping the classroom environment.... continue reading.

10 Mobile Learning Terms that Every Instructional Designer Should Know

Are you looking for a quick reference guide that can help you brush up on your mobile learning vocabulary before your next Learning and Design meeting? In this article, I'll highlight 10 mobile learning terms that you may want to commit to memory by the time you walk into the conference room... continue reading.

My Students Don’t Like Group Work

Students don’t always like working in groups. Ann Taylor, an associate professor of chemistry at Wabash College, had a class that was particularly vocal in their opposition. She asked for their top 10 reasons why students don’t want to work in groups and they offered this list (which I’ve edited slightly)... continue reading.

A future of flipped learning

There’s a lot of noise in the industry about Flipped Learning and some of the most popular sessions at our events around the world focus on this educational methodology. A system originally devised in 2000, flipped learning seeks to empower students with a more interactive approach to their studies – an education system much more suited to a generation raised by technology who are looking to impress in an ever more demanding job market. Learner-centric study is central to our ethos at Blackboard and so it is no surprise that we are fast becoming the go-to source for guidance in this approach, helping institutions such as MEF University in Istanbul to realise their vision of using Flipped Learning across the curriculum.... continue reading.

Six Things Faculty Can Do to Promote Student Engagement

Last week’s post encouraged us to reconsider what student engagement means and entails. Today I’d like to explore just some of the things teachers can do to better promote it. I’m offering six ideas here and encourage you to add to the list.... continue reading.

Active Learning: In Need of Deeper Exploration

Most of us think we know what active learning is. The word engagement quickly comes to mind. Or, we describe what it isn’t: passive learning. Definitions also abound. The one proposed by Bonwell and Eison in an early (and now classic) active learning monograph is widely referenced: involving “students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing.” (p. 2)... continue reading.

Between the Lines of Our Pedagogy

Our teaching persona is expressed in how we go about shaping the learning environment. A purposeful integration of our teaching persona helps link students with content in subtle ways. This matters because we’re after an expression of teaching persona that plays a constructive role in creating a learning environment where learners thrive and teachers flourish.... continue reading.

Expectations, Underestimations, and Realities

Here’s a strategy you can tuck in your folder of good ideas: a survey tool for assessing student expectations for the course. The survey’s designers believe that knowing what students expect is helpful. They also cite research documenting that discrepancies between teacher and student expectations often exist. So they compiled a short survey that asks students what technology they’re expecting in the course, what learning activities they’re anticipating, what they’re thinking they’ll be graded on, their expectations regarding faculty-student interactions, and how soon they’re expecting faculty to answer emails, post grades, and/or return assignments and be available to meet with them. Here’s a link to the survey: http://bit.ly/1EXVUAi. Surveys like these are great idea generators. What course expectations do you and your students have?... continue reading.

First Day of Class Activity: The Interest Inventory

The interest inventory is a simple tool to help you acquaint yourself with your students. Unlike the many icebreakers, the interest inventory is a paper-based activity and students do not have to give answers aloud in front of class. The interest inventory, therefore, helps you get to know your students privately and allows you to ask different questions than you would during oral introductions..... continue reading.

A Learner Centered Syllabus Helps Set the Tone for Learning

At its most basic level, the syllabus is used to communicate information about the course, the instructor, learning objectives, assignments, grading policies, due dates, the university’s academic integrity statement, and, in some cases, an increasingly long list of strongly worded admonitions on what is and isn’t acceptable behavior in the college classroom..... continue reading.

Türkiye’de Eğitim Teknolojileri Üzerine Düşünceler

2002 yılında başlayan NMC (New Media Consortium) Horizon Projesi eğitim teknolojileri uzmanlarından oluşan uluslararası bir topluluk olup öğrenme, öğretme, araştırma ve yaratıcı sorgulamaya dair gelişen teknolojilerin konumunu planlamayı amaçlıyor.... Devamı için tıklayınız.

How Assignment Design Shapes Student Learning

The design of assignments, that is, the actions required to complete them, shapes the learning that results. We know this, but do we make the most of what we know when we design and select assignments?... continue reading

How to Cite a Tweet in MLA, APA, and Chicago Style

As social media has evolved it has crept into academic work. I've even given research assignments in which I've asked my students to seek out and cite quotes from people on Twitter.... continue reading

Save the Last Word for Me: Encouraging Students to Engage with Complex Reading and Each Other

Online discussions are often implemented in college classes to allow students to express their understanding and perceptions about the assigned readings. This can be challenging when the reading is particularly complex, as students are typically reluctant to share their interpretations because they are not confident in their understanding. This can inhibit meaningful interactions with peers within an online discussion...... continue reading

Using Cumulative Exams to Help Students Revisit, Review, and Retain Course Content

The evidence that students retain content longer and can apply it better when exams and finals are cumulative is compelling. When I pointed to the evidence in a recent workshop, a faculty member responded, “But I can’t use cumulative exams. My students would revolt.” Students don’t like cumulative exams for the very reason we should be using them: they force regular, repeated encounters with the content. And it’s those multiple interactions with the material that move learning from memorization to understanding..... continue reading

Using Context to Deepen and Lengthen Learning

Nearly every teacher has experienced students forgetting something important. This forgetfulness comes in various forms. It might involve not following instructions for an assignment, missing a due date, forgetting important details on a test, or even forgetting to take the test itself.... continue reading

First Exam of the Semester: A Wake-up Call for Students

This weekend I discovered a “memo to students who are disappointed with their last test grade.” What a great idea! I wasn’t surprised when I found out it was more of Rich Felder’s good work.... continue reading

Instructional Methods and Education Models Shaping the Future of Higher Education

The higher education market is abuzz with new models, new innovations, and new ways to deliver content, engage students, and measure outcomes. As technology enables new learning experiences, instructional methods—such as Personalized Learning and Adaptive Learning as well as educational models such as Competency-Based Education (CBE)— become easier for institutions to implement and create change in the student experience..... continue reading

The Relationship between Participation and Discussion

My interest in participation and discussion continues. How do we use them so that they more effectively promote engagement and learning?..... continue reading

Microsoft Releases New OneNote App for Educators

Microsoft is taking the next step in OneNote after its release of the new OneNote Class Notebook Creator app on Tuesday...... continue reading

Is It Time to Rethink How We Grade Participation?

My colleague, Lolita Paff, has been exploring student attitudes and beliefs about participation. Most of her beginning economics and accounting students describe themselves as “limited” or “non-participants.” They say they don’t participate because they don’t want to look foolish in front of their peers or they learn better by listening. At this point, she has gathered some rather compelling data that grading isn’t motivating her students to participate more. “I had been pretty strongly in the if-you-grade-it-they-will-do-it camp. The evidence surprised me and made me rethink grading participation,” she writes..... continue reading

Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies and Practices - An IMHE Guide for Higher Education Institutions

Quality teaching is the use of pedagogical techniques to produce learning outcomes for students. Itinvolves several dimensions, including the effective design of curriculum and course content, a varietyof learning contexts (including guided independent study, project-based learning, collaborative learning,experimentation, etc.), soliciting and using feedback, and effective assessment of learning outcomes. Italso involves well-adapted learning environments and student support services....
continue reading

NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition

2014 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program. This eleventh edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education...
continue reading

The digital degree

ROM Oxford’s quads to Harvard Yard and many a steel and glass palace of higher education in between, exams are giving way to holidays. As students consider life after graduation, universities are facing questions about their own future....
continue reading

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus

Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching...
continue reading

Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation

Many instructors will argue that student participation in class is important. But what’s the difference between participation and engagement? What does good participation or engagement look like? How can you recognize it? And how can you tell if a student is not engaged?...
continue reading

Sınıfınızı Ters Yüz Edin !

Sınıfını ters yüz eden bir öğretmen Karl. Kullandığı bu alışılmadık metod eğitim camiası tarafından ilgi ile izlendi. Teknolojinin sınıfa taşınmasını zorunlu kılmayan ama teknolojiyi de etkili bir şekilde kullanan bu yaklaşım artık pek çok makaleye konu oluyor. ...
Devamı için tıklayınız.

Transitioning The Focus From Teachers To Students For Education Success

Flipped learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter. ...
continue reading

I Tried It and It Didn’t Work !

Someone sought me out recently to say that she’d tried something I had recommended and it didn’t work. “You need to stop recommending that to people,” she told me. “How many times did you try it?” I asked. “Once and the students hated it,” she responded. This rather direct feedback caused me to revisit (and revise) a set of assumptions that can create more accurate expectations when implementing new instructional approaches. ...
continue reading

What’s Your Relationship with Your Textbook?

I just read a couple of interesting studies exploring the relationship between the content in texts and the content covered by the teacher. The analysis was of introductory psychology courses and the conclusion not terribly surprising. The lecture and textbook material corresponded closely. If the chapter was long and the coverage extensive, a larger amount of lecture time was devoted to the topic as well. ...
continue reading

MOOCs – A Tsunami of Promises

The prediction was that MOOCs will completely change the game in higher education. Enthusiasm was general – and groupthink so tempting – that many universities across the world adopted them as a panacea for “21st century learning” (and all other problems) without hesitation or critical reflection. Those reluctant to adopt MOOCs discovered that a “philosophical difference of opinion” with the governing boards on MOOCs involves a serious personal and professional cost. ...
continue reading

Learning New Lessons

TOP-QUALITY teaching, stringent admissions criteria and impressive qualifications allow the world’s best universities to charge mega-fees: over $50,000 for a year of undergraduate study at Harvard. Less exalted providers have boomed too, with a similar model that sells seminars, lectures, exams and a “salad days” social life in a single bundle. Now online provision is transforming higher education, giving the best universities a chance to widen their catch, opening new opportunities for the agile, and threatening doom for the laggard and mediocre. ...
continue reading

The Year of the MOOC

IN late September, as workers applied joint compound to new office walls, hoodie-clad colleagues who had just met were working together on deadline. Film editors, code-writing interns and “edX fellows” — grad students and postdocs versed in online education — were translating videotaped lectures into MOOCs, or massive open online courses. As if anyone needed reminding, a row of aqua Post-its gave the dates the courses would “go live.” ...
continue reading